Closet Organizers | Closet Doors – What Type Of Doors Are Best For A Reach-in Closet?

closet sliding doors

This question comes up often. Let me start by clarifying what a reach-in closet is. It’s a closet built into the wall and usually deep enough for hanging clothing as opposed to a walk-in closet in which you can step into like a small room. Reach-in closets are also known as wall closets. The most common closet doors used for these types of closets are sliding doors. Sometimes you’ll see the use of bifold doors, doors that fold to the sides of the closet, and occasionally decorative curtains are used instead of doors altogether.

Because most reach-in closets have some front wall space blocking the ends of the closet people naturally look for a solution that will make the difficult to access areas more accessible. Generally speaking clothing that is hung or folded behind the front return walls is not easily seen especially if those walls are more than 6 or 7 inches wide.  Many people therefore think that changing their sliding closet doors to bifold closet doors will make the closet all around easier to deal with.

This is not necessarily the case. When bifold doors are open they fold up against the front return walls. This adds another 4 to 6 inches to that front wall space further blocking the clothing that you already are struggling to access. Sliding doors on the other hand at least provide a nice wide opening and do not add any extra inches to the front return wall. Depending on how wide your door opening space is to work with, sliding doors can also be ordered with more than two doors. Plus there is a triple track that can be bought as an upgrade. This feature allows for an even larger door opening.

Not widely known is that Closet Factory sells glass and mirror sliding doors. We are an authorized vender for Contractor’s Wardrobe and offer their full line. We use to sell bifold closet doors but stopped selling them for several reasons. The primary reason was bifold doors settle and frequently come out of alignment causing a great deal of servicing. The other reason is that people really weren’t happy with the doors once they were installed. As I have already stated the doors cause the front corners to be less accessible.

The best solution is to have a Closet Factory designer create a closet design that works with your sliding doors and front return walls. Sometimes the solution can be as easy as storing seasonal items in the areas that aren’t as easy to get to and your everyday wear designed in such a way that the closet organizer system lines with the door openings. Of course you could do away with the doors entirely and use curtains like others have chosen to do!

 

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